Home  >>  >>  >>  >>  >>  >>  >>  >>   >>  >>  >>

Waterfront News

Cirque du Soleil Presents TOTEM on Camden Waterfront; Tickets Go On Sale 12/7

 

Cirque du Soleil returns to the Philadelphia area with a new big top production TOTEM. Written and directed by Robert Lepage, TOTEM premieres on May 30, 2013 for a limited engagement under the blue-and-yellow Big Top at its new location on Camden's Waterfront across the River from Philadelphia.

Cirque du Soleil is excited to open its new location in the heart of one of the country's richest historical and cultural regions. Located at the base of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in Southern New Jersey, the Camden Waterfront is easily accessible by car, as well as the Riverlink Ferry at Penns Landing, the PATCO High Speed Line, SEPTA, the New Jersey Transit buses, and the RiverLine train from many points in South Jersey.

Since its world premiere in 2010, TOTEM has visited over 15 different cities in 4 different countries and has charmed close to 2 million spectators.

Cirque Club Offer
Tickets for TOTEM are available as of November 20 exclusively to Cirque Club members until December 6 at cirqueclub.com. Cirque Club Membership is free and registration is quick and simple. Cirque Club members receive advance access to the best seats under the Big Top, ticket upgrades, partner promotions and insider information on the world of Cirque du Soleil.

Tickets will be available to the general public as of Friday, December 7 online at cirquedusoleil.com/totem.

About TOTEM
The word “totem” contains the idea of the order of species. We carry in our bodies the potential of all species, all the way to our desire to fly—like the thunderbird at the top of the totem pole.

Written and directed by Robert Lepage, TOTEM traces the fascinating journey of the human species from its original amphibian state to its ultimate desire to fly. The characters evolve on a stage evoking a giant turtle, the symbol of origin for many ancient civilizations. Inspired by many founding myths, TOTEM illustrates, through a visual and acrobatic language, the evolutionary progress of species. Somewhere between science and legend, TOTEM explores the ties that bind Man to other species, his dreams and his infinite potential. The cast of TOTEM comprises 52 performing artists from 19 countries.


Read more: http://pennsylvania.broadwayworld.com/article/Cirque-du-Soleil-Presents-TOTEM-on-Camden-Waterfront-Tickets-Go-On-Sale-127-20121119#ixzz2CryyBAaH

Homeless Vets Getting Free Thanksgiving Meal Aboard Battleship New Jersey

 

By Mike DeNardo

CAMDEN, N.J. (CBS) — There will be a bit of holiday hospitality this Thanksgiving Day for some needy residents of Camden County, NJ.

On Thursday, those who have served are being served.

Homeless veterans in Camden County now have someplace to celebrate Thanksgiving.  The Battleship New Jersey is, for the first time, providing a turkey dinner for homeless vets, served chowline-style in the ship’s galley.

“We have been able to identify 62 Camden County homeless veterans that are going to be on the Battleship New Jersey for a hot traditional Thanksgiving meal,” says Perry Levine (below), the county veterans’ trustee for the battleship organization.

levine perry battleship nj  denardo

(Perry Levine. Credit: Mike DeNardo)

—–

Thirty volunteers are staffing the ship for the holiday, and a caterer has donated the food.

Levine says soup kitchens aren’t always open onThanksgiving Day, so the special dinner is a gesture homeless vets can be thankful for.

Full article here.

Cooper Norcross Run the Bridge racers brave wind, cold, and heights for a cause

 

Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: Monday, November 5, 2012, 3:01 AM

The Cooper Norcross Run the Bridge 10K was both beautiful and grueling, as 4,500 runners - and 1,000 walkers - crossed the Ben Franklin Bridge with the early-morning sun to their backs, the Philadelphia skyline ahead, and swirling winds that made the chilly air feel positively frigid.

"I'm feeling unprepared," Erin Durant, 37, of Bryn Mawr, said, hopping from foot to foot to stay warm before the start of the race at Campbell's Field Sunday. "Once I get running, I'm sure it will be fun."

Only a dedicated runner would describe a course that has three big hills, crosses a bridge 135 feet above the Delaware River, and winds through Camden before ending at the baseball stadium as fun.

Despite the low temperature, the turnout for the annual race, which benefits the Larc School in Bellmawr for students with intensive special needs, was the largest in history, said Susan Weiner, executive director of the school and the run's lead organizerBottom of Form

"We're cold but we're psyched," said Christine Dash, 46, of Lumberton, who was running with two friends. That didn't mean they weren't hoping "we'd wake up and it would be 85 degrees," she said and laughed.

At 8:15, the crowd surged onto the field for opening ceremonies, then walked to the base of the bridge. At 8:30, they were off.

The remarkable sight of several thousand crossing the Delaware on the historic, 86-year-old bridge, bathed in the light of the first dawn, is the culmination of an intense 12 months of planning.

"You're standing in Campbell's Field and the fastest runners are coming in less than a half an hour and you still see runners crossing the bridge - it's fabulous, it's beautiful, to see the sun come up," said Weiner, who started at 5:30 a.m. Sunday and who wouldn't rest until the last participant had left the stadium.

Weiner said this year's race was on a pace to exceed the $250,000 the school raised last year. Sponsors include Cooper University Hospital, the Norcross Foundation, AmeriHealth New Jersey, the Camden County Parks Department, the Delaware River Port Authority, the Camden Riversharks, and Rutgers University.

Proceeds help the Larc School buy the latest technology, such as iPads, smartboards, and interactive computers to help teach its severely disabled students, and also go toward other capital needs. Said Weiner: "Needless to say, these funds go if we need a new roof or air-conditioning - it's there to maintain our program."

The school was started in 1968 by parents seeking a better way to educate their children with special needs, and it now trains 100 students - from 3-year-olds to adults - with a staff of 120. Weiner said the event started in 1997 as a 5K near the school to finance the launch of an adult program.

"The first one had 350 people, which we thought was astounding, and it may have raised $15,000, which we thought was unbelievable," she said.

The race moved to the Ben Franklin Bridge in 2002. This year's enrollment tops last year's by 500. So many people wanted to participate the school had to cut off online registration in September.

Some of the most enthusiastic runners are Larc teachers. This was the third time for Chelsie Connolly, 26, a special-education teacher for students at the second-grade age level.

"Being a teacher here, I see where the money really goes and what we get to do with it in the classroom," Connolly said, noting that some of the devices help students who struggle with communication to speak.

Her colleague Christine Smith, 31, said one of her favorite things about the event was seeing a few of the students come out to cheer them on.

"I feel like I'm running for the kids," she said.

Less than 30 minutes after starting, the elite runners whooshed back into Campbell's Field with Samuel Ndereba, who was born in Kenya and lives in Norristown, crossing the finish line first.

"It was nice, but very cold and windy," Ndereba said.

Though the top five men and women and the top three masters - men and women over 40 - received cash prizes, the rest left with memories and maybe a case of windburn.Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: Monday, November 5, 2012, 3:01 AM

The Cooper Norcross Run the Bridge 10K was both beautiful and grueling, as 4,500 runners - and 1,000 walkers - crossed the Ben Franklin Bridge with the early-morning sun to their backs, the Philadelphia skyline ahead, and swirling winds that made the chilly air feel positively frigid.

"I'm feeling unprepared," Erin Durant, 37, of Bryn Mawr, said, hopping from foot to foot to stay warm before the start of the race at Campbell's Field Sunday. "Once I get running, I'm sure it will be fun."

Only a dedicated runner would describe a course that has three big hills, crosses a bridge 135 feet above the Delaware River, and winds through Camden before ending at the baseball stadium as fun.

Despite the low temperature, the turnout for the annual race, which benefits the Larc School in Bellmawr for students with intensive special needs, was the largest in history, said Susan Weiner, executive director of the school and the run's lead organizerBottom of Form

"We're cold but we're psyched," said Christine Dash, 46, of Lumberton, who was running with two friends. That didn't mean they weren't hoping "we'd wake up and it would be 85 degrees," she said and laughed.

At 8:15, the crowd surged onto the field for opening ceremonies, then walked to the base of the bridge. At 8:30, they were off.

The remarkable sight of several thousand crossing the Delaware on the historic, 86-year-old bridge, bathed in the light of the first dawn, is the culmination of an intense 12 months of planning.

"You're standing in Campbell's Field and the fastest runners are coming in less than a half an hour and you still see runners crossing the bridge - it's fabulous, it's beautiful, to see the sun come up," said Weiner, who started at 5:30 a.m. Sunday and who wouldn't rest until the last participant had left the stadium.

Weiner said this year's race was on a pace to exceed the $250,000 the school raised last year. Sponsors include Cooper University Hospital, the Norcross Foundation, AmeriHealth New Jersey, the Camden County Parks Department, the Delaware River Port Authority, the Camden Riversharks, and Rutgers University.

Proceeds help the Larc School buy the latest technology, such as iPads, smartboards, and interactive computers to help teach its severely disabled students, and also go toward other capital needs. Said Weiner: "Needless to say, these funds go if we need a new roof or air-conditioning - it's there to maintain our program."

The school was started in 1968 by parents seeking a better way to educate their children with special needs, and it now trains 100 students - from 3-year-olds to adults - with a staff of 120. Weiner said the event started in 1997 as a 5K near the school to finance the launch of an adult program.

"The first one had 350 people, which we thought was astounding, and it may have raised $15,000, which we thought was unbelievable," she said.

The race moved to the Ben Franklin Bridge in 2002. This year's enrollment tops last year's by 500. So many people wanted to participate the school had to cut off online registration in September.

Some of the most enthusiastic runners are Larc teachers. This was the third time for Chelsie Connolly, 26, a special-education teacher for students at the second-grade age level.

"Being a teacher here, I see where the money really goes and what we get to do with it in the classroom," Connolly said, noting that some of the devices help students who struggle with communication to speak.

Her colleague Christine Smith, 31, said one of her favorite things about the event was seeing a few of the students come out to cheer them on.

"I feel like I'm running for the kids," she said.

Less than 30 minutes after starting, the elite runners whooshed back into Campbell's Field with Samuel Ndereba, who was born in Kenya and lives in Norristown, crossing the finish line first.

"It was nice, but very cold and windy," Ndereba said.

Though the top five men and women and the top three masters - men and women over 40 - received cash prizes, the rest left with memories and maybe a case of windburn.

Full article available here.



<< 58 of 80 >>
sun

Get Updates

Sign up to our newsletter and stay up-to-date